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Kosovo Travel Information

Kosovo Travel InformationA number of cases of coronavirus (covid-19) have been detected in Kosovo, and the situation is developing rapidly. Kosovar authorities have introduced measures to stop the spread of the virus. This means, among other things, that people who do not live or work in Kosovo are not allowed to enter the country, curfew, closure of public transport, shops and eateries. For more information about the coronavirus, see the section Health.

Safety

The risk of terrorist incidents in Kosovo is considered low.

As elsewhere, it is important to take good care of valuables such as mobile phones, money, passports, jewelry and photo equipment. Pay attention and beware of pickpockets, especially at airports and where there are many people gathered. One should avoid traveling alone in the dark. If you need a taxi late at night, it is recommended that you book a taxi all the way to your door. Generally only use taxis that have the company logo visible on the car. resistance is not recommended if you are subject to robbery. All cases of crime must be reported to the police and the embassy. A copy of the written police report should be provided.

The penalties for drug-related crimes are high.

Be careful when driving a car in Kosovo as the driving style is perceived as reckless compared to Norwegian conditions. High speed and dangerous bypasses are not uncommon.

The road standard varies from area to area. The highways are of a high standard, but the roads in rural areas are in varying condition.

Taxis are easily accessible in Prishtina. Taxi companies have newer cars, while independent taxis usually have poorer technical standards.

  • Countryaah: Pristina is the capital of Kosovo. Check to find information of population, geography, history, and economy about the capital city.

There are daily passenger trains from Prishtina to Peja. The bus network is relatively well-developed and is the most widespread form of public transport between cities. There have been some instances of demonstrations that have ended with protests between protesters and police. In the case of civil unrest or riots/demonstrations, special care should be taken. Avoid public gatherings, political meetings and demonstrations.

There have been some instances of demonstrations that have ended with confrontations between protesters and police in the winter of 2015. In the case of civil unrest or riots/demonstrations, special care should be taken. Avoid public gatherings, political meetings and demonstrations.

Kosovo is located in an area of ​​high seismic activity, but no major events have been recorded in recent years. Read more about earthquake safety on the website from US authorities.

The country is flood-exposed during periods of heavy rainfall, and there is a risk of forest fire during periods of very dry weather.

Norwegian citizens staying in Kosovo for a shorter or longer period are encouraged to register on www.reiseregistrering.no.

If you need emergency medical assistance, you can call 94 from a landline or 194 from a cellphone and call for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance company and/or emergency medical services such as SOS International immediately if you are referred to a hospital for treatment of serious illness/ injury.

In crisis and emergency, the public should be encouraged to contact the embassy. The embassy is located in the capital Prishtina.

Address: Rr. Sejdiu Kryeziu No. 6, 10,000 Prishtina.
Opening hours: Monday to Friday 9am to 4pm.
Tel: 381 38 232 111 00
Internet: http://www.norway.no/en/kosovo/
Email: emb.prishtina@mfa.no

Outside the embassy's opening hours, the public can contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs' operational center on tel: +47 23 95 00 00 or by e-mail: UDops@mfa.no

Entry

Please note that entry regulations may change. The Foreign Service is not responsible if the following information on entry regulations or visa requirements is changed at short notice. It is the responsibility of the traveler to ensure that travel documents are valid for entry and to familiarize themselves with the current entry rules for each country.

Norwegian citizens do not need a visit/tourism visa for up to 90 days. Although Norwegian citizens are visa-free to a country, only passports that are approved as identification documents.

The passport must be valid for six months after the entry date. Identification papers, passports (or any copy of passports) should always be worn.

European green card insurance is not valid in Kosovo. Therefore, when crossing the border into Kosovo, you must buy local insurance. Make sure you have cash (euros) to pay for insurance and fuel. The quality of fuel varies. Delays and queues at the border between Kosovo and neighboring Serbia, Albania and Macedonia are common in the summer months.

Especially about traveling to/via Serbia: As Serbia does not recognize Kosovo's independence, traveling between the two countries may present some challenges. To travel from Kosovo to Serbia you must have a stamp of less than three months old from Serbia. If this is missing, the journey must take place via a neighboring country. When crossing from Serbia to Kosovo, Merdare (Gate 3) is the most natural choice.

Foreign citizens are less likely to experience problems crossing the border into Kosovo from Serbia and then returning the same way, or traveling by travel through Albania, Macedonia or Montenegro.

Health

Coronavirus (covid-19): A number of cases of the virus have been detected in Kosovo, and the situation is developing rapidly. Follow local authorities' advice, guidance and instructions on how to deal with the situation. Information from the Kosovar authorities in English about the spread of the virus can be found on the reporting page. More detailed information from the Kosovo Institute of Public Health can be found at Informata rreth covid-19 (in Albanian only).

Kosovar authorities have introduced measures to stop the spread of the virus. The measures include the following: Kosovo has closed its entry limits for foreign nationals and air traffic out of the country is very limited. Some municipalities in which cases of infection have been identified have been quarantined, so that no one can travel out or in of these municipalities. Restaurants and shops are closed. Public transport locally, between cities in Kosovo and out/in of Kosovo is canceled. Curfews have been introduced at certain times of the day.

If you are in Kosovo and suspect you have been infected by the virus, you can call the health authorities on +383 38 200 80 800

You can find more information and guidance from the Norwegian health authorities on the website of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. See also UD's answers to frequently asked questions about travel and coronavirus.

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Kosovo's health system is underfunded and poor. Make sure you have full travel and health insurance. Kosovo is not a member of either the EU or the EEA. European health insurance card is therefore not valid in Kosovo.

If you need emergency medical assistance, you can call 94 from a landline or 194 from a cellphone and call for an ambulance. If you are referred to a hospital for treatment in the event of a serious illness/injury, you should contact your insurance company and/or emergency medical services, such as the hospital. SOS International immediately.

The possibility of medical assistance varies. There is a low material standard on the public health service. The hospitals lack specialized equipment and there is a widespread lack of medicines and other necessary equipment. It is not recommended to perform surgical procedures in Kosovo as this is not absolutely necessary for emergency medicine.

Tap water should not be drunk. Mineral water is easy to buy. Air pollution is a problem, especially in Prishtina, and especially in winter. Travelers who have asthma or other respiratory illnesses should check with a physician beforehand whether they should take certain precautions with regard to smog and particle contamination if they are planning a winter trip.

Seek medical advice well in advance of departure for vaccines.

The Institute of Public Health recommends that anyone considering traveling to Kosovo should be vaccinated against hepatitis A, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and poliomyelitis. Although the current journey will not increase the risk of these diseases, it is advisable to update these vaccines along with travel vaccination and counseling.

There are many pharmacies, but you have to be aware that there are pirated products and medicines that have expired. Those who are addicted to certain medicines (for example, diabetics, allergy sufferers, etc.) should bring this from Norway.

Practical information

The mains is 220 volts. Adapter is not needed, as the sockets are the same as in Norway. Shorter or longer power outages may occur, especially in rural areas.

There is no time difference to Norway. Currency is euro. ATMs are well developed.

Credit cards can largely be used in shops, restaurants, cafes and hotels, especially in the capital. In smaller places, the ability to use credit cards is more limited. However, there is good access to ATMs across the country.

The area code for calls from abroad to Kosovo is +383.

Internet domain: Kosovo does not have its own Internet domain

Normal opening hours: Public offices are open from 8-16 Monday to Friday. Banks are open 8-16 on weekdays, and 10-14 on Saturdays. Shops are open from 10-20. Many supermarkets and kiosks are open late every day of the week.

Albanian and Serbian are official languages, but Albanian is by far the most widely used. English and German are common in most major cities. In the countryside, English is more limited.

Kosovo has a continental climate with hot summers and cold winters. Weather may vary. In summer the temperature rises to 30 degrees, and in winter it can be down to -10 during cold periods.

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