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Ireland Travel Information

Ireland Travel InformationStrict restrictions on movement have been introduced in Ireland to limit covid-19 infection. There are also quarantine requirements on arrival from abroad (with the exception of Northern Ireland). For more information about coronavirus, see the section Health.

Safety

Dublin and other cities in Ireland are generally considered safe.

There is a risk of being terrorized wherever you go in the world, and reasonable precautions should be taken. Travelers are encouraged to be attentive and to report suspicious items. In addition, one should follow the news and abide by orders and recommendations from local police and authorities.

Tourists should be aware of a certain risk of pocket theft and purse bagging, especially in large crowds and on the underground. When using an ATM, you should take common precautions such as hiding the code, quickly depositing cash, etc. Traveling in other cities and in the countryside is not associated with greater risk than traveling in Norway.

There is no duty to register for Norwegian citizens residing in Ireland. Norwegian tourists are encouraged to have valid travel insurance and bring their European health insurance card issued by Helfo.

  • Countryaah: Dublin is the capital of Ireland. Check to find information of population, geography, history, and economy about the capital city.

Local emergency numbers are 999 or 112.

In crisis and emergency, the public is encouraged to contact the Embassy of Dublin at the following contact information:

Royal Norwegian Embassy
Ferry House
48-53 Mount Street Lower
Dublin 2
Phone: 01 662 1800

Email: [email protected]o

Outside the embassy's opening hours, the public can contact the UD's 24-hour operating center by phone: +47 23 95 00 00 or by e-mail: [email protected]

All Norwegians are traveling abroad are encouraged to use the Ministry's system for travel registration. Travel registration is a voluntary offer to Norwegians traveling abroad. It is recommended that everyone who is going abroad for a shorter or longer period (tourists, students and other residents) register. When the Foreign Service has relevant information that we want to reach out to Norwegian travelers, this is sent out by e-mail and sms to those who have registered at reiseregistrering.no. Registration is done online at
https://www.reiseregistrering.no/.

Entry

There are currently no restrictions on entering Ireland beyond quarantine duty on arrival. Please note that entry regulations may change at short notice.

The Foreign Service is not responsible if information on entry regulations or visa requirements is changed at short notice. It is the responsibility of the traveler to ensure that travel documents are valid for entry and to familiarize themselves with the current entry rules for each country.

Ireland is not a member of Schengen, so Norwegians need a valid passport for entry. The passport must be valid throughout your stay. Norwegian citizens do not need a visa to enter Ireland. More information can be found on You do need a visa for Ireland.

If you are traveling to Ireland with children you may be asked to document the affiliation with the child. For more information, see Travel to Ireland with a child under 18.

The following rules apply to foreign nationals residing in Norway:
Travel voucher for refugees (green). The document has the following text at the bottom of one of the first pages 'The Convention of 28 July 1958'. Holders of this document are free to enter Ireland and do not need a visa. In special cases, however, you can be stopped at the border and refused entry (for example, if you have previously been expelled from or refused entry to Ireland or the United Kingdom), so it is recommended that you check with the Irish Embassy in advance.

Immigrant passport (blue): Holders of immigrant passports can travel to Ireland, but must have a visa for entry. Visa to Ireland is applied for through the Irish Embassy in Oslo.

We note that these rules apply to citizens with travel documents issued by the Norwegian authorities. Citizens of other countries, with a residence permit in Norway, but travel documents/passports issued by their own authorities, must check with the Irish Embassy themselves whether or not they need a visa for entry into Ireland.

The Irish Embassy is located at Haakon VIIs gate 1 in Oslo, and can be contacted on telephone +47 22 01 72 00. Their website is www.dfa.ie/irish-embassy/norway/.

Health

Coronavirus (covid-19): There are strict restrictions on movement in Ireland, and anyone staying in Ireland is encouraged to stay as much as possible at home. The police are authorized to impose fines or imprisonment for non-compliance with their instructions. The restrictions apply until May 5, and may be extended. You can read more about the restrictions on Public Health Measures in place until May 5 to prevent spreading Covid-19.

Norwegian travelers should keep abreast of the development of the corona virus. Follow the advice, guidance and instructions of the Irish authorities on how to deal with the situation. Irish health authorities have created their own website - Coronavirus - with useful information, including recommendations for people who may have come in contact with carriers.

You can find more information and guidance from the Norwegian health authorities on the website of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. See also UD's answers to frequently asked questions about travel and coronavirus.

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Health and food hygiene in Ireland is about the same as in Norway. Under the EEA Agreement, Norwegians in Ireland receive treatment under the public health system, HSE, on a par with Irish citizens. In addition, there are good private treatment options, but prices vary. Norwegian citizens are obliged to bring European health insurance card through the use of HSE services. The embassy also recommends having valid travel insurance when traveling to Ireland.

See details on the Health Service Executive and on Nav's website.

For official health professional travel advice and health professional guidance when traveling abroad see the Public Health Institute's website.

Health and food hygiene in Ireland is about the same as in Norway. Under the EEA Agreement, Norwegians in Ireland receive treatment under the public health system, HSE, on a par with Irish citizens. There are also good private treatment options, but these are expensive. Norwegian citizens are obliged to bring European health insurance card through the use of HSE services. The embassy also recommends having valid travel insurance when traveling to Ireland.

See details at https://www.hse.ie/eng/ and http://www.nav.no/

For official health professional travel advice and health professional guidance when traveling abroad see the Public Health Institute's website.

Practical information

The area code for calls from Norway to Ireland is +353. The telephone network is stable.

When traveling to Ireland, you need to reset at one hour. Ireland is in time zone GMT and Norway in GMT +1.

The mains is 240 volts 50Hz. Electrical equipment designed for 220 volts can be used, but you need an adapter for a three-pin socket.

The most common credit cards are Visa, Mastercard, Eurocard, and with limited use of Diners Club and American Express. Credit card use is very common in businesses, restaurants and hotels. In pubs and smaller shops, cash is usually preferred for small amounts. However, there is widespread use of 'contactless' payment in many places. The amount limit for this is € 30. One cannot expect to pay taxis with cards. Uber is not available in Ireland, but there are mobile phone apps that match this service.

Public transport in Ireland is mainly based on buses and trains. In addition, there are trams in Dublin (Luas). All three offer apps to search for the next departure. The fastest options in Dublin are tram or runway (DART)

In Dublin & vicinity you can buy a Leap Card that you can use on all public transport. This card is used by registering in and out of the drives. On the bus you only have to register by stating where you are going. The Leap Card provides cheaper single travel than single tickets. If you want to buy single tickets, it is important to note that buses do not give back change, so you must have the exact amount in coins. The buses also do not take short.

In Ireland, it is a left-hand drive. Therefore, always remember to look to the opposite side when crossing the road or when crossing junctions or roundabouts.

It is recommended just as in Norway, ie in restaurants and cafes with valet service at the tables, taxi drivers, etc. If you buy a drink over the counter in a pub, it is not recommended, but it is recommended if a waiter has delivered the drink.

Normal opening hours are for shops from 09:00/10:00 to 18:00/19:00 (also Saturday and Sunday in the major cities, Sundays from 12:00). Banks are open from 10am to 4pm (5pm on Thursdays) and hold Saturdays and holidays. Offices and Public Agencies: 9-17. All banks and government offices are closed on public holidays. In addition to Christmas, New Year, Easter and St. Patrik's Day, the first Monday in May, June and August, as well as the last Monday in October, are counted as holidays in Ireland.

Irene is a polite people, and 'please' and 'sorry' are two words one should remember to use in all contexts, otherwise one is often perceived as rude.

Always add a 'please' when ordering food and drink. You say 'sorry' if you bump into or pass close to another person. It is considered ordinary courtesy to hold the door for the one who comes right behind.

Irish dress relatively formally in a work context, but the trend is towards less formal attire. In business, dress and tie are common. Most dress more informally in a sociable context, such as in theater and at concerts. In pubs it is usual to order at the bar counter. Many pubs serve hot food.

Ireland is bilingual. Irish is the official language of the country, but the vast majority speak English daily. There are areas, especially on the west coast, where mainly Irish are used in daily life and on signs. Most Irish TV channels are in English.

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