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Cook Islands Travel Information

Due to the spread of the coronavirus, the authorities have implemented measures for visitors, among other things. a. Entry restrictions. Foreign nationals have been introduced for foreign nationals who have traveled from (or in transit through) specific countries within 14 days before arriving in the Cook Islands. For more information about coronavirus and travel restrictions, see the section Health.

Safety

Most trips to the Cook Islands are completed without any special problems. Theft of valuables, poor road standards and transport safety, poorer safety standards especially in risk sports and when transporting by boat between islands can occur. Special precautions should be taken during the hurricane season, from November to April.

The closest Norwegian consulate is to Fiji. Norway also has two consulates in New Zealand, one in Wellington and one in Auckland. Responsible Norwegian Embassy for the Cook Islands is the Norwegian Embassy in Canberra. The risk of terrorist incidents in the Cook Islands is considered low.

The Cook Islands have severe penalties for drug offenses.

There is little crime on the Cook Islands. Theft of valuables such as cash, jewelry, camera, mobile phone etc. are the most common criminal acts aimed at tourists.

It is recommended to make copies of passports, tickets, bank cards, etc., and keep them separately from the original documents. It is not recommended to keep credit cards, cash and travelers checks together. Spread the risk so that you will not be able to pay in case of theft.

There is left-hand traffic on the Cook Islands. The road standard on the Cook Islands is poor, and there will often be people and animals on the road. Motorcyclists in particular are prone to road accidents.

The safety standard is poorer than what you are used to, especially in the area of ​​risk sports and transport by boat between the islands. Consult locally for safe areas for swimming and other water sports.

The Cook Islands can be hit by tropical storms, hurricanes and cyclones with strong winds and large amounts of rainfall with subsequent danger of flooding and landslides. The hurricane season is from November to April. Cook Islands may also be affected by a tsunami.

Look for messages and advice from local authorities both before, during and after an emergency. If you need assistance, contact the Norwegian Embassy in Canberra. General precautions for natural disasters in Oceania can be found here.

In a crisis situation where there is reason to believe that family and friends may be concerned, the embassy encourages Norwegians in the affected areas to contact family members in Norway. Family members can also contact the local authorities in the affected areas. Norwegian citizens are encouraged to have valid travel insurance.

Local emergency numbers are as follows: ambulance 998, fire 996, police 999, The Hurricane Center +682 22 261.

Entry

Please note that entry regulations may change. The Foreign Service is not responsible if the following information on entry regulations or visa requirements is changed at short notice. It is the responsibility of the traveler to ensure that travel documents are valid for entry and to familiarize themselves with the current entry rules for each country.

Norwegian citizens do not need a visa for stays of up to 31 days on the Cook Islands. One has to pay the exit tax in advance when leaving. It is forbidden to import fruits and plants into the Cook Islands. Passport must be valid for up to six months after scheduled departure date.

A visa is not required for tourist visits up to 31 days, provided that you can present a valid passport, tickets for your return journey as well as documentation of financing and residence during your stay. Passport must be valid for up to six months after scheduled departure date. For the latest updated information on travel destinations to the Cook Islands see here or contact the nearest embassy. Although Norwegian citizens are visa-free to a country, only passports that are approved as identification documents. It is the responsibility of the traveler to ensure that travel documents, any visa, etc. are valid.

A departure tax of NZD 55 for adults and NZD 15 for children between two and two years must be paid on departure. Payment can be made to Westpac Bank's branches either in the capital Rarotonga or at Rarotonga International Airport.

It is forbidden to import fruits and plants into the Cook Islands. All food must also be cleared by the customs authorities before importation.

Health

Coronavirus (covid-19): Due to the prevalence of the virus, the Cook Islands authorities have introduced entry refusal for foreign nationals who have traveled from (or in transit through) specific countries within 14 days before arriving in the Cook Islands. Information on the measures and the countries in question can be found on the Ministry of Health website. It is the authorities of the Cook Islands who are responsible for updating the web pages.

Norwegian travelers should also keep abreast of the development of the coronavirus, as well as keep up to date with guidance and instructions from the authorities on the Cook Islands.

You can find more information and guidance from the Norwegian health authorities on the website of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. See also UD's answers to frequently asked questions about travel and coronavirus.

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When traveling to the Cook Islands you should be careful with mosquito protection, outbreaks of dengue fever occur. Treatment services in hospitals are limited and in severe cases evacuation to New Zealand or Australia will be necessary.

See the National Institute of Public Health's recommendations regarding vaccination for foreign travel. There are outbreaks of dengue fever, which is a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. The mosquito species that transmit the virus often stay in and around towns and cities and usually sting during the day. Malaria is not found on the Cook Islands. There are no poisonous animals or insects.

There is no pressure chamber that can treat diving sickness. The nearest treatment center is in New Zealand. Therefore, make sure you have good travel insurance and check carefully what the insurance covers before departure.

Fountains in Rarotonga should be safe to drink, but first it is recommended to consult locally. Boil the water or drink bottled water outside Rarotonga.

Practical information

The area code for phone calls to the Cook Islands is +682. The Cook Islands are located eleven-twelve hours behind Norway, depending on the summer and winter time. Visa, Mastercard, Diners and Amex can be used in most hotels, restaurants and shops. For the use of foreign mobile phones, a local sim card must be obtained.

Power uses 240V and three-point plugs.
The area code for calls from Norway to the Cook Islands is +682. In order to use a foreign mobile phone you have to buy a local SIM card and prepaid card. It is only mobile coverage for locally purchased sim card and cash card at Rarotonga and Aitutaki.

Visa, Mastercard, Diners and Amex can be used in most hotels, restaurants and shops. There are only a few ATMs and only at Rarotonga and Aitutaki. Shops, post offices and banks are normally open Monday to Friday 0800-1600. Most shops are open on Saturdays from 9am to 12pm. See overview of holidays and holidays.

It is not common to give tips on the Cook Islands. In most contexts it will be considered vulgar to bargain at the stated price. It may be perceived as insulting to the locals to go for light clothing outside beaches and tourist hotels. Topless sunbathing is also considered insulting. Camping is illegal. Cook Islands is an English-speaking country.

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