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Belarus Travel Information

Belarus Travel InformationAlthough Belarus has not closed its borders, entry and exit in practice are limited by neighboring countries' entry restrictions.

Safety

Belarus is generally a safe country to travel in. Belarus is a well-organized and controlled society with little common crime. By taking ordinary simple precautions, most people will avoid problems. As elsewhere, you should avoid deserted areas in the evenings and be wary of pickpockets. It is always recommended to have a passport with a valid Belarusian visa.

Norwegian citizens residing in, or planning to travel to Belarus, are encouraged to keep up to date via the Embassy's website, as well as to register their travel via www.reiseregistrering.no.

Crime: Belarus is a well-organized and controlled society with little common crime. By taking ordinary simple precautions, most people will avoid problems. As elsewhere, you should avoid deserted areas in the evenings and be wary of pickpockets.

Traffic: Care should be taken in traffic. The roads in Belarus are generally very good, but as otherwise, surprises may appear. tractors on smaller roads in the districts.

Terror: On April 11, 2011, a heavy explosive charge was detonated at one of the Minsk subway stations. Twelve were killed and nearly 200 people injured. The incident came as a shock to the public. It wasn't long before some younger Belarusians were arrested. No special travel advice has been established for the country. The risk of further projections is considered low.

Travel insurance: Norwegian citizens are encouraged to have valid travel insurance. Norwegians traveling to Belarus should note that the National Insurance Scheme does not cover expenses related to illness or accidents.

  • Countryaah: Minsk is the capital of Belarus. Check to find information of population, geography, history, and economy about the capital city.

Entry

Please note that entry regulations may change. The Foreign Service is not responsible if the following information on entry regulations or visa requirements is changed at short notice. It is the responsibility of the traveler to ensure that travel documents are valid for entry and to familiarize themselves with the current entry rules for each country.

As of July 27, 2018, there is a visa requirement for Norwegian citizens for stays up to 30 days - with certain restrictions. The freedom of visa applies only to those with ordinary passports (police passports), not for travelers with diplomatic or service passports. The freedom of visa applies only when entering and departing by air to/from Minsk International Airport (Minsk 2 airport) - not by car or train. The freedom of visa does not apply to travel to or from Russia because there is no border control on these trips.

For further information on travel to Belarus, contact the Belarusian Embassy in Stockholm.

Travelers must always show valid travel insurance and have funds equivalent to 49 BYN per day for their stay.

The price of the visa varies based on the type and duration. A 30 day visit visa for Norwegians costs 60 euros.

A prerequisite for obtaining a visa is that has with the invitation of the inviting party in Belarus. Norwegians can apply for visas from Belarusian embassies and consulates, and the nearest stations are Sweden, Latvia, Lithuania and Finland. Read details about the conditions here.

You can also get a visa at the airport in Minsk after applying for a minimum of two days in advance at the nearest Belarusian embassy or consulate. It does not apply to those who come by plane from Russia. If you fly to Belarus via Russia, you must also apply for Russian transit visas.

The visa must be registered with the local police (OVIR) no later than five days after arrival. If you stay in a hotel, this is done by the hotel. When entering, one must have health insurance that is valid in Belarus. For more information see the website of the Belarusian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Currency declaration may be required upon entry. Antiques, paintings and other valuables brought into the country must be registered with the customs authorities. If this is not done, you may have trouble removing the items on departure. The authorities regard as antiques everything dating from 1945 or earlier. Dog and cat must have a valid vaccination certificate and international veterinary certificate upon importation.

A valid driver's license and car insurance are required for foreign motorists who want to drive into Belarus. Original documents confirming the car's ownership are presented at the border. From November 1 to March 31, driving with light is required.

See also details from Belarus Foreign Ministry.

Health

Coronavirus (covid-19): Coronavirus infection has been registered in Belarus. The Belarusian authorities have so far not imposed any special restrictions on border crossings, but people arriving from vulnerable countries can be tested on a voluntary basis. Although Belarus has not closed its borders on March 25, in practice, entry and exit are limited by neighboring countries' entry restrictions. For now, Belavia has some international flights from Minsk, check the company's website. Belarusian health authorities can be contacted by hotline: 375 (29) 156-85-65.

Norwegian travelers should keep abreast of the development of the corona virus. Feel free to follow local authorities' advice, guidance and instructions on how to deal with the situation. Information about the coronavirus in Belarus can be found on the website of the Ministry of Health.

You can find more information and guidance from the Norwegian health authorities on the website of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. See also UD's answers to frequently asked questions about travel and coronavirus.

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Belarus hospitals generally maintain a fairly good standard, but not necessarily at the western level. Although the health staff has good education, it is assumed that they have knowledge in Belarusian, Ukrainian or Russian. In some cases, access to medicines may vary.

For updated recommendations on vaccination before departure, see information from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

Diseases that may be appropriate to vaccinate against may be hepatitis A and B, diphtheria, tetanus, tetanus, typhoid, tuberculosis, polio. Belarus hospitals generally maintain a fairly good standard, but not necessarily at the western level. Although the health staff has good education, it is assumed that they have knowledge in Belarusian, Ukrainian or Russian. In some cases, access to medicines may vary.

The southeastern parts of Belarus (Gomel County) were particularly affected by the fallout from the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. Some parts are still closed to ordinary traffic. Beyond this, the radiation situation is not of particular concern.

Tap water is not recommended for cooking and drinking. Bottled water is available for purchase.

Practical information

Belarus is a materially quite well-developed country, even considering the current economic crisis. Although the range of goods and services is not always top notch, Belarus is not an underdeveloped country.

The authorities have little acceptance for regime criticism and there are rigid laws and regulations against between other meetings in public places.

There is one hour time difference between Norway and Belarus, Belarus is one hour ahead of Norway.

There is a good cultural offer, entertainment and other opportunities for visitors. Ordinary Belarusians are consistently friendly and well educated.

Some young people in the big cities speak some English, but otherwise it pays to be able to Belarusian, Ukrainian or Russian to progress in Belarus.

Power - The voltage on the power supply in Belarus is 220 volts, 50 Hz. The use of a voltage stabilizer is recommended.

Telephone - There is nothing special to postpone on the telephone system, including cell phone coverage.

Currency and Credit Cards: In major cities, regular credit cards such as Visa and MasterCard are accepted at hotels, many restaurants and shops. Belarusian rubles can be withdrawn from ATMs virtually everywhere, while foreign currency exchange is easily done in banks or in-house exchange offices of which there are also many.

Opening hours: Banks and public offices are usually open weekdays 0900-1800, supermarkets and other shops every day approx. 1100-2100 (some are closed Sundays).

Official Holidays: New Year - January 1, Orthodox Christmas January 7, Women's Day March 8, Workers Day May 1, Radonitsa (Remembrance Day) May 3 (in 2011), Victory Day May 9, Independence Day 3. July, October Revolution Day November 7, Catholic Christmas December 25.

Emergency number: Norwegian Embassy in Kiev +380 44 2812200
Euro-Alarm, Copenhagen (including European Travel Insurance): +45 70 15 25 00
UD's operational center on tel: +47 23 95 00 00, e-mail: UDops @ mfa. no

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